Social Security Disability and Unemployment

To be eligible for Social Security Disability benefits, a claimant must not be able to return to their past work, nor do any other work that exists in the national economy. A disability under Social Security must also last at least 12 months or be expected to result in death.

Submitting an application for Social Security Disability benefits is you saying that you are entitled to benefits under the above definition – in other words, that you are not able to work. In signing your application, you swear, under penalty of law, that you are making no false statements on your application.

If you apply for unemployment insurance you must also swear, under penalty of law, that you are making no false statements on your application.  Persons who collect unemployment insurance swear that they have looked for work each week, and that, if work was found, they would be ready, willing and able to do it.

Therefore, an unemployment claim is tantamount to saying “I am able to work,” while an Social Security disability claim is stating “I am not able to work.”  Both statements are made under penalty of perjury, but both cannot be true.

Filing both at the same time is, at the most fraudulent and in the least may affect your credibility to both Unemployment and Social Security.

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